Paradise of the blind reflection

Hardison Certified Educator Some of the most significant recurrent symbols in Paradise of the Blind are blindness, sickness, water and river. Another is sky; it is tied closely to the river symbol. Being fluid symbols, like the fluidity of life, these symbolic representations can vary with different uses:

Paradise of the blind reflection

Man falls deceiv'd [ ] By the other first: Man therefore shall find grace, The other none: Thus while God spake, ambrosial fragrance fill'd [ ] All Heav'n, and in the blessed Spirits elect Sense of new joy ineffable diffus'd: Beyond compare the Son of God was seen Most glorious, in him all his Father shon Substantially express'dand in his face [ ] Divine compassion visibly appeerd, Love without end, and without measure Grace, Which uttering thus he to his Father spake.

O Father, gracious was that word which clos'd Thy sovran sentence, that Man should find grace; [ ] For which both Heav'n and Earth shall high extoll Thy praises, with th' innumerable sound Of Hymns and sacred Songs, wherewith thy Throne Encompass'd shall resound thee ever blest.

For should Man finally be lost, should Man [ ] Thy creature late so lov'd, thy youngest Son Fall circumvented thus by Paradise of the blind reflection, though joynd With his own folly? So should thy goodness and thy greatness both [ ] Be questiond and blaspheam'd without defence. To whom the great Creatour thus reply'd.

O Son, in whom my Soul hath chief delight, Son of my bosom, Son who art alone All hast thou spok'n as my thoughts are, all As my Eternal purpose hath decreed: Man shall not quite be lost, but sav'd Paradise of the blind reflection will, Yet not of will in him, but grace in me Freely voutsaft; once more I will renew [ ] His lapsed powers, though forfeit and enthrall'd By sin to foul exorbitant desires; Upheld by me, yet once more he shall stand On even ground against his mortal foe, By me upheld, that he may know how frail [ ] His fall'n condition is, and to me ow All his deliv'rance, and to none but me.

Some I have chosen of peculiar grace Elect above the rest; so is my will: The rest shall hear me call, and oft be warnd [ ] Thir sinful state, and to appease betimes Th' incensed Deitie while offerd grace Invites; for I will cleer thir senses dark, What may suffice, and soft'n stonie hearts To Prayer, repentance, and obedience due, Though but endevord with sincere intent, Mine ear shall not be slow, mine eye not shut.

And I will place within them as a guide My Umpire Conscience, whom if they will hear, [ ] Light after light well us'd they shall attain, And to the end persisting, safe arrive. This my long sufferance and my day of grace They who neglect and scorn, shall never taste; But hard be hard'nd, blind be blinded more, [ ] That they may stumble on, and deeper fall; And none but such from mercy I exclude.

Paradise of the blind reflection

But yet all is not don; Man disobeying, Disloyal breaks his fealtie, and sinns Against the high Supremacie of Heav'n, [ ] Affecting God-head, and so loosing all, To expiate his Treason hath naught left, But to destruction sacred and devote, He with his whole posteritie must dye, Dye hee or Justice must; unless for him [ ] Som other able, and as willing, pay The rigid satisfaction, death for death.

Say Heav'nly Powers, where shall we find such loveWhich of ye will be mortal to redeem Mans mortal crime, and just th' unjust to save, [ ] Dwels in all Heaven charitie so deare?

He ask'd, but all the Heav'nly Quire stood muteAnd silence was in Heav'n: And now without redemption all mankind Must have bin lost, adjudg'd to Death and Hell By doom severe, had not the Son of God, In whom the fulness dwells of love divine, [ ] His dearest mediation thus renewd.

Father, thy word is past, man shall find grace; And shall grace not find means, that finds her way, The speediest of thy winged messengers, To visit all thy creatures, and to all [ ] Comes unpreventedunimplor'd, unsought, Happie for man, so coming; he her aide Can never seek, once dead in sins and lost; Attonement for himself or offering meet, Indebted and undon, hath none to bring: Thou at the sight Pleas'd, out of Heaven shalt look down and smile, While by thee rais'd I ruin all my Foes, Death lastand with his Carcass glut the Grave: Then with the multitude of my redeemd [ ] Shall enter Heaven long absent, and returne, Father, to see thy face, wherein no cloud Of anger shall remain, but peace assur'd, And reconcilement; wrauth shall be no more Thenceforth, but in thy presence Joy entire.

Admiration seis'd All Heav'n, what this might mean, and whither tend Wondring; but soon th' Almighty thus reply'd: O thou in Heav'n and Earth the only peace Found out for mankind under wrauth, O thou [ ] My sole complacence!

As in him perish all men, so in thee As from a second root shall be restor'd, As many as are restor'd, without thee none. His crime makes guiltie all his Sons, thy merit [ ] Imputed shall absolve them who renounce Thir own both righteous and unrighteous deeds, And live in thee transplanted, and from thee Receive new life.

So Man, as is most just, Shall satisfie for Man, be judg'd and die, [ ] And dying rise, and rising with him raise His Brethren, ransomd with his own dear life.

So Heav'nly love shall outdoo Hellish hate, Giving to death, and dying to redeeme, So dearly to redeem what Hellish hate [ ] So easily destroy'd, and still destroyes In those who, when they may, accept not grace.

Nor shalt thou by descending to assume Mans Nature, less'n or degrade thine owne. Then all thy Saints assembl'd, thou shalt judge [ ] Bad men and Angels, they arraignd shall sink Beneath thy Sentence; Hell her numbers full, Thenceforth shall be for ever shut.

Mean while The World shall burn, and from her ashes spring New Heav'n and Earth, wherein the just shall dwell [ ] And after all thir tribulations long See golden days, fruitful of golden deeds, With Joy and Love triumphing, and fair Truth.

But all ye GodsAdore him, who to compass all this dies, Adore the Son, and honour him as mee. No sooner had th' Almighty ceas't, but all The multitude of Angels with a shout [ ] Loud as from numbers without number, sweet As from blest voices, uttering joy, Heav'n rung With Jubilee, and loud Hosanna's filld Th' eternal Regions: Thee Father first they sung Omnipotent, Immutable, Immortal, Infinite, Eternal King; thee Author of all being, Fountain of Light, thy self invisible [ ] Amidst the glorious brightness where thou sit'st Thron'd inaccessible, but when thou shad'st The full blaze of thy beams, and through a cloud Drawn round about thee like a radiant Shrine, Dark with excessive bright thy skirts appeer, [ ] Yet dazle Heav'n, that brightest Seraphim Approach not, but with both wings veil thir eyes, Thee next they sang of all Creation first, Begotten Son, Divine Similitude, In whose conspicuous count'nance, without cloud [ ] Made visible, th' Almighty Father shines, Whom else no Creature can behold; on thee Impresst the effulgence of his Glorie abides, Transfus'd on thee his ample Spirit rests.

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Back from pursuit thy Powers with loud acclaime Thee only extoll'd, Son of thy Fathers might, To execute fierce vengeance on his foes, Not so on Man; him through their malice fall'n, [ ] Father of Mercie and Grace, thou didst not doome So strictly, but much more to pitie encline: No sooner did thy dear and onely Son Perceive thee purpos'd not to doom frail Man So strictly, but much more to pitie enclin'd, [ ] He to appease thy wrauth, and end the strife Of Mercy and Justice in thy face discern'd, Regardless of the Bliss wherein hee sat Second to thee, offerd himself to die For mans offence.

O unexampl'd love[ ] Love no where to be found less then Divine! Mean while upon the firm opacous Globe Of this round World, whose first convex divides The luminous inferior Orbsenclos'd [ ] From Chaos and th' inroad of Darkness old, Satan alighted walks: Here walk'd the Fiend at large in spacious field.

So on this windie Sea of Land, the Fiend [ ] Walk'd up and down alone bent on his prey, Alone, for other Creature in this place Living or liveless to be found was none, None yet, but store hereafter from the earth Up hither like Aereal vapours flew [ ] Of all things transitorie and vain, when Sin With vanity had filld the works of men: Both all things vain, and all who in vain things Built thir fond hopes of Glorie or lasting fame, Or happiness in this or th' other life; [ ] All who have thir reward on Earth, the fruits Of painful Superstition and blind Zeal, Naught seeking but the praise of men, here find Fit retribution, emptie as thir deeds; All th' unaccomplisht works of Natures hand, [ ] Abortive, monstrous, or unkindly mixt, Dissolvd on earth, fleet hither, and in vain, Till final dissolution, wander here, Not in the neighbouring Moonas some have dreamd; Those argent Fields more likely habitants, [ ] Translated Saintsor middle Spirits hold Betwixt th' Angelical and Human kinde: First from the ancient World those Giants came With many a vain exploit, though then renownd: The Stairs were then let down, whether to dare The Fiend by easie ascent, or aggravate His sad exclusion from the dores of Bliss.

IETF Preview. From November 3 to 9, the IETF will gather for its first visit to Bangkok, Thailand. Here's snapshot of some of the sessions and topics on tap for the week. Wedding receptions these days are getting increasingly elaborate and expensive. Many couples first book the reception hall and then go looking for a church or chapel (and . HAil holy light, ofspring of Heav'n first-born, Or of th' Eternal Coeternal beam May I express thee unblam'd? since God is light, And never but in unapproached light Dwelt from Eternitie, dwelt then in thee, [ 5 ] Bright effluence of bright essence increate. Or hear'st thou rather pure Ethereal stream, Whose Fountain who shall tell? before the Sun, Before the Heavens thou wert, and at the voice.

Satan from hence now on the lower stair [ ] That scal'd by steps of Gold to Heav'n Gate Looks down with wonder at the sudden view Of all this World at once.The literal meaning of 'Barzakh' is a veil or a barrier that stands between two things and which does not allow the two to meet.

For example, that part or region of the ocean in which waves of both the sweet and the salty waters bounce and yet God has provided between them an invisible barrier whereby one cannot overcome another. Delegation strategies for the NCLEX, Prioritization for the NCLEX, Infection Control for the NCLEX, FREE resources for the NCLEX, FREE NCLEX Quizzes for the NCLEX, FREE NCLEX exams for the NCLEX, Failed the NCLEX - Help is here.

Paradise Lost is an epic poem in blank verse by the 17th-century English poet John Milton (–). The first version, published in , consisted of ten books with over ten thousand lines of verse.A second edition followed in , arranged into twelve books (in the manner of Virgil's Aeneid) with minor revisions throughout and a note on the versification.

The rock engraved image to the right is called a fravahar or farohar (also spelt faravahar). It is an image found on rock inscriptions and carvings commissioned by the ancient Persian Achaemenian kings. The image is usually portrayed above the image of a king, and the figure in the farohar is identical to the king below in features as well as clothing.

Sarkicism (derived from the Greek σάρξ, or “flesh”) is a religious/philosophical system that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs, and spiritual practices largely based on teachings attributed to “Grand Karcist Ion” 1, its deified initiativeblog.comnts practice ritual cannibalism, human sacrifice, corporeal augmentation, thaumaturgy, dimensional manipulation, and the formation.

Searchable Paradise Lost Searchable Paradise Lost. Use the"Find on this Page" or similar search tool on your browser's toolbar to search the entire text of Paradise Lost for names, words and phrases.

Milton's archaic spelling has been modernized to faciltate search.

Paradise of the blind reflection
Paradise Lost: Book 3